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Map of Europe

Map of Trees Per Square Kilometer in Europe

trees-per-square-km-europe

This great little map shows just how wooded the countries of Europe are. One of the general trends we can see is that the northern countries of Europe tend to have more trees. Although there are a few exceptions one being Portugal and some of the Baltic countries like Slovenia and Croatia.

The most heavily forested countries in Europe are Finland, Sweden and the aforementioned Slovenia. there are some notable mentions like Montenegro, Russia, Albania and Estonia.

As would be expected, Iceland has a very low concentration of trees. Due to it being a country of mostly volcanic activity, topped with ice and snow. The countries that are a bit of a surprise for having such a low tree population are England, Scotland, Whales and Ireland. When thinking of these countries you generally conjure up images of green countryside, although the green in this case must be hedges, plains and farmland.

Map of Berlin

map of Berlin

This map of Berlin shows all the major boroughs and suburbs they are broken up into. When travelling around Berlin make sure you always have a map on you as it can get pretty confusing.

Road Map of Europe

Road Map of Europe

 

So here we have a map of all the major highways in Europe. There are no highway names as the map would not probably fit onto the website. It is just here to give you an idea of what countries are connected by the main road network. If you click on the map above it will expand and you will be able to see a bit better which countries are connected by these highways. Later on we will be adding a new map with the names of the countries and the highways that are connecting them.

Map of Eastern Europe

Map of Eastern Europe

The countries in Red above make up what is known as Eastern Europe. East Europe as a concept has been in decline since the end of the cold war. Many of the countries on the Western border of the above countries marked in red have either entered the European Union or are moving to join. Joining the European Union is conceptual a step to becoming a Western country. Countries like Slovenia, Poland, Bulgaria and even the Czech Republic. Look at this map for a more complete idea of the countries that make up Western Europe and a list of the countries trying to enter the European Union.

The end of the cold war saw the end of the many large conglomerations of communist nations. The biggest of these was the Soviet Union (The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) which was made up of countries such as Russia, Belarus, Latvia, Ukraine, Georgia and a number of other countries. so the map above is more of a modern representation of the countries that formerly made up East Europe. Other former Communist Nations that split up into smaller countries are  as follows:

  • Yugoslavia – which split into Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia Herzegovina, Montenegro, Serbia and Kosovo.
  • Czechoslovakia – Which split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

So as you can see even though we still use the terms Western and Eastern Europe, they are quickly becoming an outdated concept and the boundary that separates East and West is blurrier than ever.

here we have a list of the countries that make up Eastern Europe.

Map of Western Europe

Map of Western Europe

Western Europe as we know it, is a geopolitical construct that came into being at the time of the Cold War. Although references to West and Eastern Europe can be traced back to the Roman empire.

Shortly after World War 2 the alliance between the USSR and England/USA broke down and in it’s place rose the cold war. The two sides where named the East and the West. The west was made up of the Western alliance countries of Europe, including countries such as Spain, England and France. However in this stand off even countries not in Europe like the United States of America were considered part of the “The West”.

Eastern Europe was a conglomeration of countries that the USSR annexed and countries that were subservient to the USSR. most if not all of these countries were communist countries.

Post Cold War, the terminology of Western and Eastern Europe remained, even though technically the lines between East and West were becoming blurry.

In the map above the countries in blue are considered western countries, although during the cold war Germany was split into East and West. The Green countries are countries that are becoming more and more Westernized and would probably consider themselves as part of Western Europe now. many of which have joined or are attempting to join the European Union.